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24 posts tagged with "thoughts"

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· 4 min read
Aleh Zasypkin

Hello!

NOTE

Although not directly related to this topic, I encourage you to take a look at the latest US national cyber security workforce and education strategy from July 31, 2023. The thumbnail picture for this post is taken from there. It's an interesting read!

As you might have guessed, I spend a lot of time thinking about application security - almost every day, in fact. At my day job, I'm constantly pondering how to enhance Kibana's security in a scalable manner without overburdening my already hardworking team. Outside of work, I'm equally dedicated to making Secutils.dev even more valuable to fellow engineers looking for better security tools.

While I'd love to tell you there's a magic tool or a combination of tools that can make your application completely secure, I don't believe it's quite that simple - at least not yet. If you're working within tight budget constraints, resist the urge to spend it all on solutions like Veracode, Snyk, Secutils.dev, or any other security tool. Also, don't obsess over supply chain security and penetration testing just yet. Instead, focus your initial investment on something absolutely critical - educating your engineers about security. You'll reap the rewards, and so will your team. Only once you have a solid educational program or processes in place should you consider investing in additional security-oriented tools.

· 4 min read
Aleh Zasypkin

Hello!

I'm sharing a quick post today to highlight a few newsletters and podcasts that I find useful. Hopefully, they'll be of use to you too. This post is deliberately brief because I firmly believe that the most effective way to learn something new is to start doing it. Hands-on experience is and always was the master key to personal growth. There's no real shortcut, you can't absorb it all from reading a blog post or tuning into a podcast.

However, that doesn't mean I've sworn off reading, watching, and listening to learn new things or get inspired. I do partake, but I keep it to a bare minimum. In general, I try hard to focus on "creating" over "consuming." Now, let's get to it:

· 5 min read
Aleh Zasypkin

Hello!

This is the second part of my reflection sparked by the recent “2023 State of Open Source Security” report from Snyk. It got me thinking about the price we pay for false positives in software security. In my previous post, “The Cost of False Positives in Software Security, Part 1: Small Applications”, I talked about how true and false positives affect smaller applications like Secutils.dev. Now, I want to take the same idea and apply it to a much larger software that’s a big part of my daily work: Kibana.

Saying that Kibana is one of the biggest Node.js apps you can find on GitHub would be no exaggeration. Just a quick glance at its monthly GitHub activity tells you all you need to know about its sheer size and scope!

Kibana Monthly Stat

The code size, complexity, and the multitude of use cases it serves, combined with the numerous teams working on it, make Kibana an ideal case study for this post.

· 7 min read
Aleh Zasypkin

Hello!

The other day, I was reading the "2023 State of Open Source Security" report by Snyk. It’s a nice report to read if you're curious about the state of the modern application security landscape, but here’s the part that particularly resonated with me:

The constant rising tide of vulnerabilities continues to lead to security backlogs and decisions not to fix vulnerabilities. Part of the challenge here is false positives, which have increased alongside growing security processes and tooling automation. This is clear evidence that, while automation allows for much better coverage and detection, it can introduce data quality issues that are challenging for already stretched security teams to triage and accurately assess. In fact, false positives are reported at such a high volume that it is highly likely security teams are misclassifying some of these warnings. The sheer volume of CVEs that are ignored and left unfixed in applications (either by not applying patches or not versioning software) indicates that organizations are struggling to keep up with the demands of maintaining an airtight supply chain security posture. The widespread introduction of Al and automation injects additional uncertainty, making it harder to stay abreast, let alone get ahead, of supply chain security concerns.

False positives in security are something that really bothers me, as I happen to work on security for both large applications like Kibana, with hundreds of contributors, and smaller ones like Secutils.dev, where I'm the sole developer.

· 5 min read
Aleh Zasypkin

Hello!

As you might have learned from the "A Plan for the Q3 2023 Iteration" post, my focus for this iteration is on adding support for automatic scheduled resource checks for the "Web Scraping → Resources trackers" utility in Secutils.dev. This work is already in progress, and in this post, I'd like to share more details about how I'm designing the scheduler for Secutils.dev. If you're building a scheduler for your application, hopefully, you can learn a useful thing or two.

· 4 min read
Aleh Zasypkin

Hello!

In one of my previous posts, I mentioned that I wrapped up the "Q2 2023 Apr-Jun" iteration and moved on to the next one: "Q3 2023 Jul-Sep". In this post, I want to briefly cover what I'm going to work on during this iteration. I'll highlight three main areas: improvements to the certificate templates, scheduled automatic web page resources checks, and shareable content.

Q3 2023 Jul-Sep iteration